a penguin of very little brain

jhameia:

jhameia:

jhameia:

THE SEA IS OURS is an anthology of Southeast Asian steampunk. We are looking for steampunk stories that are set in Southeast Asia (SEA), or secondary worlds that evoke Southeast Asia, with Southeast Asian protagonists, in any of the countries that make up the region: Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, East Timor, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. We are seeking historically and technologically-innovative stories.

Steampunk, for the purposes of this anthology, is defined as an aesthetic that combines technofantasy, anachronism, retro-futurism, an alternate history/world, and the evocation of an incipient industrial revolution. How does the steampunk aesthetic look, feel, sound, smell, or taste like in these regions? What kind of technologies would grow in resource-rich SEAsia? What do our historical figures, our Parameswaras, Trung sisters, Lapu-Lapus, do in such a world?

Submissions are encouraged to explore various levels and kinds of technologies, not just steam technology. Locals myths can also find their way into these stories; what does the mix of technology and fantasy look like in such worlds? We welcome exploration of all kinds of stories: from the extraordinary to the everyday. What changes does accelerated technology create for the local landscape and societies? If historical events are given a steampunk twist, how do their outcomes change, or stay the same? 

SUBMISSIONS CLOSE JUNE 30, 2014. 
We will contact all submitters within four weeks of submissions closing.

GENERAL GUIDELINES:
  • •Stories should have a visible development arc, even if they are somewhat experimental.
  • •Stories should be in English, but we take a broad view of English, which includes dialect, accents, local slang, and non-English words that express nuances that standard English can’t.
  • •Characters should be embedded in their settings. We should not be able to transplant the specifics of their story easily, even if they are based on common science fiction/fantasy archetypes.
  • •Local takes on actual historical events are highly encouraged, although not necessary in alternate world settings. Mention in your submission email the specific event you are referencing.
  • •Stories featuring queer characters, characters with disabilities, non-normative relationships, and other such non-mainstream narratives are welcome.

Click through for full submission guidelines!!!

ETA: So apparently no one saw fit to mention to me that Indonesia was missing from the list and I had to find out through some wayward middleman tweeting that folks were feeling left out

So I’m editing and re-bageling for ALL THE INDONESIANS! 

And if folks could keep reblogging this as a LINK and not convert it to text because it makes following reblogging kind of wonky, that’d be much appreciated

Y’all, blackwolfchng and I really want to see a lot of SEAsian contributors!! We have contacts from the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, a couple in Thailand, and SEAsian-American folx… if you have people in Cambodia, Burma, Timor, Brunei, and Laos that you think we should contact, let us know!!

I also want to specify that non-SEAsians with connections to SEA are also welcome.

I also want to specify that SEAsian ethnic groups who don’t exactly belong to any specific nation-state are also welcome.

I also want to specify that diaspora SEAsians are also welcome.

I also want to specify that SEAsia has a long history of trade with South Asia, Africa, Arabia and East Asian countries and we welcome stories about those histories as well. 

THE POSSIBILITIES ARE LARGE AND ENDLESS.

uh i should…start this at some point…

beyondvictoriana:

Fantastic new art from James Ng! His description:

"Chimera"


To combat heavy snowfall from the winter season, the Imperial City’s Guild of Engineers constructed one dozen snow blowers to clear the streets to maintain regular trade and transport.


The Greek mythological beast Chimera, a creature with a lion’s head and a snake’s tail, is the inspiration behind the design and the nickname given to these winter machines. The lion’s head devours the fallen snow as the snake’s head expels it to the side of the road. Though menacing in appearance, the snow blowers were constructed solely to ensure the welfare of the city.

Prints available now at http://www.jamesngart.com/store.html Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jamesngart Twitter: @JamesNgArt

beyondvictoriana:

Fantastic new art from James Ng! His description:

"Chimera"
To combat heavy snowfall from the winter season, the Imperial City’s Guild of Engineers constructed one dozen snow blowers to clear the streets to maintain regular trade and transport.
The Greek mythological beast Chimera, a creature with a lion’s head and a snake’s tail, is the inspiration behind the design and the nickname given to these winter machines. The lion’s head devours the fallen snow as the snake’s head expels it to the side of the road. Though menacing in appearance, the snow blowers were constructed solely to ensure the welfare of the city.

Prints available now at http://www.jamesngart.com/store.html Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jamesngart Twitter: @JamesNgArt

beyondvictoriana:

Mad Max Meets Apache Steampunk in Killer of Enemies by Joseph Bruchac
Nowadays, I read so many steampunk-labeled books that very few retain the innovation factor for me. It’s fine to see tropes that establishes the aesthetic as a subgenre, but it takes a lot to make a steampunk book read fresh to me.
Then, comes along Killer of Enemies by Joseph Bruchac: a book that’a steampunk by way of Mad Max rather than gaslamp London. Killer of Enemies is not just a gulp of fresh air, but a hyperventilating-inducing adrenaline rush. Oh, and did I mention that this young adult book was initially pitched to me as “post-apoc Apache steampunk?” Yeah, let that catchphrase sink in a bit.
[Shoot first, ask questions later. Read the review here.]

beyondvictoriana:

Mad Max Meets Apache Steampunk in Killer of Enemies by Joseph Bruchac

Nowadays, I read so many steampunk-labeled books that very few retain the innovation factor for me. It’s fine to see tropes that establishes the aesthetic as a subgenre, but it takes a lot to make a steampunk book read fresh to me.

Then, comes along Killer of Enemies by Joseph Bruchac: a book that’a steampunk by way of Mad Max rather than gaslamp London. Killer of Enemies is not just a gulp of fresh air, but a hyperventilating-inducing adrenaline rush. Oh, and did I mention that this young adult book was initially pitched to me as “post-apoc Apache steampunk?” Yeah, let that catchphrase sink in a bit.

[Shoot first, ask questions later. Read the review here.]

steampunkxlove:

thewritingcafe:

Guide to Writing Steampunk
BASICS

Punk Genres: most common genres are in italics


Atomicpunk: Optimistic retro science fiction based on the Space Age. Think The Jetsons.
Biopunk: This genre is about altering genetics and DNA. These stories often take place in the near-future in which humans have been altered or in which human experimentation is common.
Candlepunk: Similar to clockpunk, but darker and with less technology.
Clockpunk: Think Da Vinci’s inventions, but more advanced while. This genre follows the aesthetics and technology of Western civilization during the mid to late middle ages, though sometimes it’s set in the Victorian era.
Cyberpunk: Has advanced technology and often focuses on artificial intelligence and the cyber world. The setting is often near-future rather than far-future. Blade Runner is an example.
Dieselpunk: Based on aesthetics and technology between World War I and World War II, sometimes up until the Cold War.
Decopunk: Ranges from the aesthetics of the 1920’s to the 1950’s. Decopunk aesthetic is heavily based on modernism. Less gritty than dieselpunk.
Elfpunk: Basically urban fantasy, but with common high or epic fantasy creatures put in an urban setting rather than vampires and werewolves.
Nanopunk: Similar to biopunk, but biotechnology is less available and nanotechnology is common.
Sandalpunk: Set in ancient worlds, such as Rome, but with advanced technology.
Splatterpunk: Extremely graphic and contains a lot of gore.
Steampunk: This genre gets its name from the heavy steam-powered technology involved. Aesthetics are based on the Victorian and industrial eras of the Western world, though other cultural elements may be used.
Western Steampunk: Similar to steampunk, but with Western (as in Wild West) aesthetics and settings.
So why are there so many sub genres? For starters, they help agents and publishers get an idea of what they’re in for if you’re going through the traditional publishing route. While bookstores usually just put these genres within science fiction or fantasy, you can still market your book through sub genres to reach a specific group of people who are looking for these genres. However, there are a lot of sub genres, most of which many have not heard of. If you’ve written one of these genres and intend to publish it, the best would be to put it under another name (with the exception of steampunk, cyberpunk, and biopunk). For example, if you have written a candlepunk story, you can propose it as fantasy, alternate historical fiction, or any other genre it may fit in. While atomicpunk is quite common, it’s not well known by that name. If you have written an atompunk story, the best way to market it would be to call it retro science fiction. But what’s the difference between punk genres and historical fiction? The technology is a big difference. It’s usually more advanced for the time it’s modeled after.
 
TECHNOLOGY

The technology is one of the defining aspects of steampunk. It’s the basis for the world you’re writing in. For the typical steampunk story, technology will be (of course) steam powered.
 


A Guide to Steampunk Gadgets and Technology
Airship
Steampunk Airships Inspiration
Steampunk Blimps
Technology Steampunk Instructables
Steampunk Technology Inspiration
How Steampunk Works
Steampunk Gadgets
100 Functional Steampunk Gadgets

CHARACTERS & FASHION

Another defining feature of steampunk is the aesthetics and the characters. Steampunk takes the latter part of the word (punk) to mean the opposition of the mainstream, though that’s not always necessary in your story.

Research jobs common in the Victorian age and add steam to it. Your characters will revolve around their setting and their clothing may be a part of that too.


Steampunk Archetypes
Steampunk Clothing References
Steampunk as Aesthetic
Steampunk Character Inspiration
Steampunk Character Building
Characters, Personalities, and Personas

READING

Best Steampunk Books
Steampunk
Best Steampunk and Gaslight
Favorite Steampunk/Alt History
Best Fantasy, Steampunk, and Science Fiction BDSM
Asian Steampunk
Buttkicking Female Steampunk
Best Steampunk YA Books
Best Unknown Steampunk
Steampunk Adventures
Gay Steampunk
Best Vampire Steampunk
Steampunk Novels and Short Stories
Best of Cyberpunk
Best Cyberpunk Books
Books with Cyberpunk Themes
Books About Video Games and Virtual Reality

MORE
Researching Steampunk
A Brief Introduction to Steampunk
Steampunk Tropes
What is Steampunk?
So You Want to: Write a Steampunk Story
Steampunk Inspiration
8 Tips and Tricks Every Steampunk Writer Should Know
Writing Steampunk Fiction Tips
Kady Cross Shares her Secrets to Writing Steampunk
Tips for Successfully Creating Steampunk
Steampunk Wiki
List of Writing Steampunk Resources
Steampunk: a List of Themes
How to Write Steampunk
Writing Steampunk
Tips for Writing Steampunk
CYBERPUNK
Cyberpunk
Technology in Cyberpunk
Cyberpunk Technology
History of Cyberpunk
Cyberpunk Esstentials
What Happened to Cyberpunk?
Cyberpunk Fashion (2) (3) (4)
Cyberpunk Attitude

HEY LOOK ANON. :3

So white. Let’s not forget Silkpunk (Chinese Steampunk) and Beyond Victoriana as a start, yes? That link to ‘Asian Steampunk’ above doesn’t count because a) the goodreads list is called ‘Oriental Steampunk’ and b) a lot of the stuff on that list is actually actively racist and it’s mostly written by not-Asian people. 

steampunkxlove:

thewritingcafe:

Guide to Writing Steampunk

BASICS

Punk Genres: most common genres are in italics

  • Atomicpunk: Optimistic retro science fiction based on the Space Age. Think The Jetsons.
  • BiopunkThis genre is about altering genetics and DNA. These stories often take place in the near-future in which humans have been altered or in which human experimentation is common.
  • Candlepunk: Similar to clockpunk, but darker and with less technology.
  • ClockpunkThink Da Vinci’s inventions, but more advanced while. This genre follows the aesthetics and technology of Western civilization during the mid to late middle ages, though sometimes it’s set in the Victorian era.
  • Cyberpunk: Has advanced technology and often focuses on artificial intelligence and the cyber world. The setting is often near-future rather than far-future. Blade Runner is an example.
  • Dieselpunk: Based on aesthetics and technology between World War I and World War II, sometimes up until the Cold War.
  • Decopunk: Ranges from the aesthetics of the 1920’s to the 1950’s. Decopunk aesthetic is heavily based on modernism. Less gritty than dieselpunk.
  • Elfpunk: Basically urban fantasy, but with common high or epic fantasy creatures put in an urban setting rather than vampires and werewolves.
  • Nanopunk: Similar to biopunk, but biotechnology is less available and nanotechnology is common.
  • Sandalpunk: Set in ancient worlds, such as Rome, but with advanced technology.
  • Splatterpunk: Extremely graphic and contains a lot of gore.
  • Steampunk: This genre gets its name from the heavy steam-powered technology involved. Aesthetics are based on the Victorian and industrial eras of the Western world, though other cultural elements may be used.
  • Western Steampunk: Similar to steampunk, but with Western (as in Wild West) aesthetics and settings.
So why are there so many sub genres? For starters, they help agents and publishers get an idea of what they’re in for if you’re going through the traditional publishing route. While bookstores usually just put these genres within science fiction or fantasy, you can still market your book through sub genres to reach a specific group of people who are looking for these genres.
 
However, there are a lot of sub genres, most of which many have not heard of. If you’ve written one of these genres and intend to publish it, the best would be to put it under another name (with the exception of steampunk, cyberpunk, and biopunk). For example, if you have written a candlepunk story, you can propose it as fantasy, alternate historical fiction, or any other genre it may fit in. While atomicpunk is quite common, it’s not well known by that name. If you have written an atompunk story, the best way to market it would be to call it retro science fiction.
 
But what’s the difference between punk genres and historical fiction? The technology is a big difference. It’s usually more advanced for the time it’s modeled after.
 
TECHNOLOGY
The technology is one of the defining aspects of steampunk. It’s the basis for the world you’re writing in. For the typical steampunk story, technology will be (of course) steam powered.
 
CHARACTERS & FASHION
Another defining feature of steampunk is the aesthetics and the characters. Steampunk takes the latter part of the word (punk) to mean the opposition of the mainstream, though that’s not always necessary in your story.
Research jobs common in the Victorian age and add steam to it. Your characters will revolve around their setting and their clothing may be a part of that too.
READING

MORE

CYBERPUNK

HEY LOOK ANON. :3

So white. Let’s not forget Silkpunk (Chinese Steampunk) and Beyond Victoriana as a start, yes? That link to ‘Asian Steampunk’ above doesn’t count because a) the goodreads list is called ‘Oriental Steampunk’ and b) a lot of the stuff on that list is actually actively racist and it’s mostly written by not-Asian people. 

Whenever I’m writing Chinese steampunk I almost always start by playing this song - ‘梅花' (Plum Blossom) - 2003 Remix by Li Xiang-Lan (李香蘭)

That is why I can’t get behind a celebration of multicultural steampunk that really seems to bank on being able to create and dress in costumes and clothing and props of other cultures. Something different and something fun to do. Something cool to research. Something interesting to get to know, and maybe learn something about a different culture. But for all your knowledge about how we dressed and what the gender norms of 19th century China were, what is being done to ensure POC steampunk feel safe? Feel more than just tokens? Tony Hicks of Tinplate Studios said to me at GearCon, “sometimes, you just want to be.” And sometimes, that being also means being able to talk about some of the dumb shit we experience and being understood for that, being comfortable that no, we’re not alone.What do you think?

Before you start bleating about how it’s a multicultural world and ain’t we all human and race doesn’t matter and we should all be free to use different things from different cultures, let me reiterate once more: culture is more than just things. It’s about people. And people of colour live in the still very racist system that dictates the discourse on what multiculturalism should be like. And thus multiculturalism is co-opted, not to begin critical conversations between peoples, but so white people can get their jollies off dressing like an exotic non-white person, eat weird foods, learn about foreign cultures, as a nifty thing for the day, without necessarily doing the hard work of confronting how difficult living in a multicultural world can be, when certain cultures are privileged over others.

"Using the term Multiculturalism" (in steampunk) by Jaymee Goh (jhameia on tumblr)
Hey if you are at a loss for what you’re doing tonight, Friday 13th in Melbourne, you should come to Intrigue. I will be on the door in my super awesome modified qipao, it is a queer/alt friendly event, it is a good Friday fun time. 
The fact that it is Friday 13th is a coincidence, I swear. Ish. 

Hey if you are at a loss for what you’re doing tonight, Friday 13th in Melbourne, you should come to Intrigue. I will be on the door in my super awesome modified qipao, it is a queer/alt friendly event, it is a good Friday fun time. 

The fact that it is Friday 13th is a coincidence, I swear. Ish. 

sora2522:

doctormonocle:

Steampunk Sailormoon

O-oh my…

having some feels

sora2522:

doctormonocle:

Steampunk Sailormoon

O-oh my…

having some feels

beyondvictoriana:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

really-shit:

The REAL Toy Story | Michael Wolf

Behind those toys are a whole new world of “fun”.

Forever reblog!

This is not steampunk, but everything to do with the contradictions of steampunk subculture that will become more apparent with the rise of mainstream consumerism: a community that scorns mass production, but to an extent, is dependent upon mass produced goods to create the styles its aspires toward.

Many steampunk props, guns, and modification source materials for the person of average means is created by a larger global production force that is undergoing their own industrial revolution.

While many people thrift, mod, and create their own subcultural goods, that is more possible for participants with a certain level of class privilege (time to thrift, time to build, financial means to get special-order goods, access to stores that sell wholesale products, etc). And there are many steampunk participants who choose to mod, thrift or upcycle using source materials that are produced overseas (the classic Nerf mod being an example).

As mass popularity of steampunk items grow, this connection to non-Western mass production will need to be ethically addressed by participants of our community.

jhameia:

archiemcphee:

“Chinese farmer Wu Yulu drives his rickshaw pulled by his self-made walking robot near his home in a village at the outskirts of Beijing. The robot is the latest and largest development by hobby inventor Wu, who started building robots in 1986 with wire, metal, screws and nails found in rubbish sites.”

that is the most steampunk shit I’ve seen in a while

movie review! tai chi hero / 太极2 (and a bit on 太极1从零开始)

Over at one of my other blogs, my review of Tai Chi Hero with some rambling on the previous instalment. Because I love Chinese SFF, and steampunk, and awesome things. 

jhameia:

On the heels of tainopunk’s exchange with Robert Brown, this is a call-out from a steampunk POC to the whole community. I draw comparisons to the recent outcry against Evelyn Kriete which may or may not make sense to you depending on whether or not you know who she is, because I think the different attitudes of the communities at large towards these two people is very telling.

jhameia:

LOOK AT JAMES NG’S NEW IMPERIAL STEAMPUNK PIECE!!!! It has VAMPIRES and A MAD EXORCIST and A GIANT TORTOISE.

okay we need to talk about the ways in which this is amazing, because the dragon turtle has something under its paw (SUPER TRADITIONAL), and a banner in its mouth, and it’s just so amazing on so many levels. 

jhameia:

LOOK AT JAMES NG’S NEW IMPERIAL STEAMPUNK PIECE!!!! It has VAMPIRES and A MAD EXORCIST and A GIANT TORTOISE.

okay we need to talk about the ways in which this is amazing, because the dragon turtle has something under its paw (SUPER TRADITIONAL), and a banner in its mouth, and it’s just so amazing on so many levels. 

Saw Tai Chi 0 this evening; full review to follow, but in short it was way better than I was expecting. Fierce lady (played to full fierceness by Angelababy); hilarious steampunk; adorable (girl) child prodigy; Brother Tofu doing kungfu with tofu in his hands; self-aware video game visual references (I swear). Several issues, but still looking forward to the sequel (allegedly later in October).

moniquill:

fyeahsteampunk:

Source: https://www.facebook.com/evil.pastry

Note the traditional 19th century baby duck cup.

moniquill:

fyeahsteampunk:

Source: https://www.facebook.com/evil.pastry

Note the traditional 19th century baby duck cup.